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Juice WRLD – Hip Hop and Eugenics: A JuiceWrld Story

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PREAMBLE

Good evening, residents of hiphoptrendsnow. Today, I am but a humble servant here to ask for just a few minutes of your time. I will break down eugenics, its necessity in today’s society, and how it can be neatly applied to the growing fanbase of popular incel JuiceWRLD. Before starting, however, I direct you to a brief introduction on eugenics.

A BRIEF INTRODUCTION ON EUGENICS

Eugenics is a movement that is aimed at improving the genetic composition of the human race. Historically, eugenicists advocated selective breeding to achieve these goals. Today we have technologies that make it possible to more directly alter the genetic composition of an individual. However, people differ in their views on how to best (and ethically) use this technology.

In 1883, Sir Francis Galton, a respected British scholar and cousin of Charles Darwin, first used the term eugenics, meaning “well-born.” Galton believed that the human race could help direct its future by selectively breeding individuals who have “desired” traits. This idea was based on Galton’s study of upper class Britain. Following these studies, Galton concluded that an elite position in society was due to a good genetic makeup. While Galton’s plans to improve the human race through selective breeding never came to fruition in Britain, they eventually took sinister turns in other countries.

The eugenics movement began in the U.S. in the late 19th century. However, unlike in Britain, eugenicists in the U.S. focused on efforts to stop the transmission of negative or “undesirable” traits from generation to generation. In response to these ideas, some US leaders, private citizens, and corporations started funding eugenical studies. This lead to the 1911 establishment of The Eugenics Records Office (ERO) in Cold Spring Harbor, New York. The ERO spent time tracking family histories and concluded that people deemed to be unfit more often came from families that were poor, low in social standing, immigrant, and/or minority. Further, ERO researchers “demonstrated” that the undesirable traits in these families, such as pauperism, were due to genetics, and not lack of resources.

Committees were convened to offer solutions to the problem of the growing number of “undesirables” in the U.S. population. Stricter immigration rules were enacted, but the most ominous resolution was a plan to sterilize “unfit” individuals to prevent them from passing on their negative traits. During the 20th century, a total of 33 states had sterilization programs in place. While at first sterilization efforts targeted mentally ill people exclusively, later the traits deemed serious enough to warrant sterilization included alcoholism, criminality chronic poverty, blindness, deafness, feeble-mindedness, and promiscuity. It was also not uncommon for African American women to be sterilized during other medical procedures without consent. Most people subjected to these sterilizations had no choice, and because the program was run by the government, they had little chance of escaping the procedure. It is thought that around 65,000 Americans were sterilized during this time period.

The eugenics movement in the U.S. slowly lost favor over time and was waning by the start of World War II. When the horrors of Nazi Germany became apparent, as well as Hitler’s use of eugenic principles to justify the atrocities, eugenics lost all credibility as a field of study or even an ideal that should be pursued.

Eugenics in America took a dark turn in the early 20th century, led by California. From 1909 to 1979, around 20,000 sterilizations occurred in California state mental institutions under the guise of protecting society from the offspring of people with mental illness.

Many sterilizations were forced and performed on minorities. Thirty-three states would eventually allow involuntary sterilization in whomever lawmakers deemed unworthy to procreate.

In 1927, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that forced sterilization of the handicapped does not violate the U.S. Constitution. In the words of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendall Holmes, “…three generations of imbeciles are enough.” In 1942, the ruling was overturned, but not before thousands of people underwent the procedure.

In the 1930s, the governor of Puerto Rico, Menendez Ramos, implemented sterilization programs for Puerto Rican women. Ramos claimed the action was needed to battle rampant poverty and economic strife; however, it may have also been a way to prevent the so-called superior Aryan gene pool from becoming tainted with Latino blood.

According to a 1976 Government Accountability Office investigation, between 25 and 50 percent of Native Americans were sterilized between 1970 and 1976. It’s thought some sterilizations happened without consent during other surgical procedures such as an appendectomy.

In some cases, health care for living children was denied unless their mothers agreed to sterilization.

Now that we have a solid basis and foundational understanding of the concept of eugenics, it is time to look at the concept of art, the formation of hiphop, and its slow degradation.

The Concept of Art & Formation of Hip-Hop in the late 20th Century

To Plato, art was imitation of nature, but in the 19th century, photography took over that function, and in the 20th, abstract art overturned the whole notion that art was about representation. And although art meant skill early on, conceptual artists elevated ideas over execution. So what is art? Does it have to be beautiful? Expressive? Original? Uplifting? Intellectual?

Art means so much to so many, it is very difficult to pinpoint an exact definition. What is agreed upon by nearly all, however, is that art is creative expression from an individual or group of individuals. This brings us to the advent of Hip-Hop.

When hip hop music first developed in the late 1970s, not many people knew about it. It was created in the poorest districts of New York City by African American and Latino teenagers as part of a hip hop scene that also produced breakdancingand graffiti art. Many of these young people were unemployed, but some found work as DJs in discos where they learned deejaying techniques like how to use two turntables and a DJ mixer to play records non-stop. Sometimes they’d also deejay at free block parties in their neighbourhoods where they’d play funk and disco tracks non-stop and ask a friend to act as their MC. The MC would introduce the DJ and encourage everyone to dance and have a good time. Some MCs tried to be more entertaining by talking in time to the beat of the music and using rhymes, and by doing this they invented rapping.

As rapping became more popular, more DJ and MC duos formed. As the competition grew, DJs began improving their beats by using techniques like sampling short drum breaks and scratching. MCs also began improving their raps by using more complex rhymes and by developing flow, or the ability to rap with a good sense of rhythm and a natural flowing style. Hip hop music was only performed live at first, but in 1979 a hip hop single called Rapper’s Delight by The Sugarhill Gang was released, and to everyone’s surprise it became a top-ten hit worldwide.

After the success of Rapper’s Delight, many other hip hop records were released like Kurtis Blow’s The Breaks and Afrika Bambaataa’s Planet Rock. Most of these songs were about having fun, but in 1982 Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five released The Message, an early example of socially-conscious hip hop. It had a slow funk groove with melodic synthesizer riffs and the raps were about social issues like poverty, crime and the stress of living in a dangerous city.

In the mid-80s, rappers like LL Cool J began creating hip hop singles with catchy melodic hooks. New York duo Run DMC also used hooks in their songs but added hard-rock guitar to create a popular style called rap rock, and their 1986 album Raising Hell became hip hop’s first top-ten album. When punk rock group Beastie Boys began shouting raps instead of singing, their style also became very popular and their debut album Licensed To Ill became hip hop’s first number-one album.

By the late 80s, many hip hop beats were being made in a studio with drum machines, synthesizers and samples from old funk and disco records. In 1987, New York duo Eric B. & Rakim released Paid In Full, one of hip hop’s finest albums on which Rakim raps over Eric’s sample-heavy beats. In the late 80s, a new style of political hip hop developed when groups like Public Enemy began demanding political change and an end to injustice and racism.

In the early 90s, producers began using audio editing software and digital effects to create new styles of alternative hip hop such as jazz rap in which groups like De La Soul and A Tribe Called Quest added jazz and R&B samples to their beats. The Fugees used elements of reggae and soul to create their own new style, and all-girl group Salt-N-Pepa created a fun new style of hip hop pop. Later in the 90s, rappers like Common, Mos Def and Talib Kweli created a new style of socially-conscious hip hop when they began rapping about political and social issues over breakbeat grooves played by jazz and funk musicians. Common’s album Like Water for Chocolate and Mos and Talib’s album Black Star are fine examples of this style.

The most successful styles of the 90s were the hardcore rap of New York and the gangsta rap and G-Funk of Los Angeles. New York’s Wu-Tang Clan created one of the first hardcore styles when they rapped about gangster life over swinging hip hop beats with samples from martial-arts movies. In 1994 a young rapper named Nas released his first album Illmatic. Its loose mid-tempo beats, jazzy samples and Nas’ poetic rapping made Illmatic one of hip hop’s greatest albums. Other popular hardcore rappers include Puff Daddy, The Notorious B.I.G., Jay-Z and 50 Cent.

Los Angeles’ gangsta rap developed from the rap music of artists like Ice-T and NWA. Ice-T began by sampling funk rhythms and rapping about the dangers of drugs, crime and dropping out of school in tracks like 1990s You Played Yourself. The members of NWA were from Compton, one of LA’s poorest and most violent districts, and they rapped about the injustice and police violence in their neighbourhood. Their angry raps included a lot of explicit language, and the media attention this created helped their albums reach the top of the charts. Former NWA member Ice Cube released his classic gangsta album Death Certificate in 1991, and Tupac Shakur, or 2Pac, released his own classic album All Eyez on Me before being killed in 1996.

When Dr Dre, another former NWA member, released his album The Chronicin 1991, G-Funk was heard for the first time. G-Funk producers often sampled funk grooves by George Clinton’s P-Funk groups Parliament and Funkadelic and slowed them down to create relaxed beats with funky bass lines, electronic effects and female backing vocals. G-Funk rappers also rapped about gangsta-rap topics, but they focused on partying, drugs and sex more than violence, crime and guns. Classic G-Funk albums include DJ Quik’s Quik Is the Name and Snoop Dog’s Doggystyle. Hardcore, gangsta and G-Funk rappers often adopted gangster images and their explicit language and the way they rapped about women upset many people. But many others, especially teenage boys, loved these styles and helped them become the sound of mainstream hip hop.

Hip hop became a major genre of popular music in the 21st century, with hip hop singles and albums topping the charts worldwide. Local hip hop scenes developed in many countries and produced successful artists like the UK’s Dizzee Rascal and Canada’s Drake. Many female rappers also became successful, including Missy Elliott, Lil’ Kim, Lauren Hill and Nicki Minaj. Hip hop has had a strong influence on 21st-century pop music, with many pop songs including elements of hip hop. Pop singers and rappers often collaborate to produce tracks with catchy pop choruses and rapped verses like the single See You Again, a collaboration between pop singer Charlie Puth and rapper Wiz Khalifa that topped the charts in 96 countries in 2015.

In the 1990s, most major artists were from New York or Los Angeles, but artists from the South became popular after 2000. They included the duo Outkast who combined Southern-soul grooves and riffs with clever, entertaining raps. Other popular artists from the South include Usher, T.I., Ludacris and B.o.B. from Atlanta, Three 6 Mafia from Memphis, Bun B from Texas, and Lil Wayne from New Orleans. More recently, Southern artists like Future and Young Thug have been creating exciting new styles of alternative hip hop.

Midwestern artists also became popular at this time. Marshall Mathers, better known as Eminem, was surrounded by hip hop culture in the poor Detroit neighbourhood in which he grew up. As a teenager he won local rapping competitions, one of the first white rappers to do so. His natural flow and the honesty and humour of his raps won over the crowds, but because he wasn’t a gangsta rapper he couldn’t get a record contract. After struggling for many years, he finally got a record deal. Nearly all of his albums have topped the charts worldwide and he’s now one of the best-selling artists of all-time.

Another major artist from the Midwest is Chicago’s Kanye West. In 2004 he released The College Dropout, the first of a series of chart-topping alternative hip hop albums that helped change the direction of hip hop music. Kanye and Eminem proved that rappers didn’t have to make gangsta rap records to succeed, and alternative hip hop soon replaced gangsta rap as the genre’s most popular style. While most hip hop artists are either producers or rappers, Kanye is regarded as a master of both. His sample-heavy tracks have used elements of classical music, gospel, jazz and soul as well as rock and R&B, and he uses many rapping styles, from slow and relaxed to fast and aggressive. He’s often called the most influential hip hop artist of the 21st century because of his role in changing hip hop’s direction and because of the number of styles he’s helped to create like the electronic rap of Black Skinhead and the gospel-influenced hip hop of Jesus Walks.

Since 2010, exciting new styles of alternative hip hop and underground raphave been created by young artists who’ve begun their careers by releasing free mixtapes and using social media to build a following and attract music industry offers. Notable releases from the best of these artists include all of Kendrick Lamar’s mixtapes and albums, Chance the Rapper’s Acid Rap, YG’s Still Brazy, Schoolboy Q’s Blank Face, Danny Brown’s Old, Kevin Gates’ Islah, Joey Badass’ All-Amerikkkan Bada$$, Kamaiyah’s A Good Night in the Ghetto, Vince Staples’ Big Fish Theory, Brockhampton’s Saturation trilogy, and Denzel Curry’s TA13OO. However, since a breakout hit in 2018, a new face has begun to rise on the scene.

A brief history of JuiceWRLD

Jarad Higgins (born December 2, 1998), known professionally as Juice WRLD, is an American rapper, singer, and songwriter from Calumet Park, Illinois. He is primarily known for his breakout hits, “All Girls Are the Same” and “Lucid Dreams”. His music has been described as “emo-leaning and genre-bending”.

Jarad Higgins was born on December 2, 1998 in Chicago and grew up in Calumet Park, one of its suburbs. He later moved to Homewood, Illinois and attended Homewood-Flossmoor High School. Higgins’ parents split up when he was young and his father left his mother to raise him as a single mother alongside multiple siblings.

Involved in music his entire life, he first learned piano, followed by guitar and drums. Higgins began to take rapping seriously in his sophomore year of high school.

Higgins began to develop himself as an artist in his freshman year of high school. His first track, “Forever”, was released on Soundcloud in 2015 under the name JuiceTheKidd. His first track produced by his current producer Nick Mira, “Too Much Cash”, was released in 2017.

While releasing projects and songs on SoundCloud, Higgins worked in a factory to attempt to create income for himself, though was fired within two weeks after finding himself dissatisfied with the job. After joining the internet collective, Internet Money, Higgins released his debut full-length EP on 15 June 2017 titled 9 9 9 with the song “Lucid Dreams” breaking out and growing Higgins’ following.

In December 2017, Higgins released the three song EP, Nothings Different. The EP was featured on numerous hip-hop blogs such as Lyrical Lemonade which helped Higgins track “All Girls Are the Same” gather popularity. In February 2018, a music video directed by Cole Bennett was released. Following the release of “All Girls Are The Same”‘s video, Higgins was signed to Interscope Records for $3,000,000 and a remix featuring Lil Uzi Vert was previewed. “All Girls Are the Same” was critically praised, receiving a “Best New Music” designation from Pitchfork. It was also Higgins first entry on a Billboard chart, debuting at no. 92 on the Billboard Hot 100.

In May 2018, “Lucid Dreams” was officially released as a single and given a music video. The song soon debuted at no. 74 on the Billboard Hot 100. Higgins released his first studio album on May 23, 2018 with Goodbye & Good Riddance.

As of October 2017, Higgins is living in Los Angeles.

Higgins, however, has faced criticism as of late as many have begun comparing the lyrical content of his songs to the ideals valued by incels and incel-culture.

Incels and their Ideals

In the late 1990s, a lonely teenager on the West Coast fired up his dial-up modem to find someone to talk to. He was a shy kid, too introverted to feel fully comfortable in the real world, and he logged on to the early internet’s bare-bones web forums for a sense of connection. There he found friends: other people who were awkward in real life, particularly when it came to sex and dating.

The group eventually became a community, one that began using a phrase to describe their romantic troubles — “involuntary celibacy.” Later the term would get shortened: “incel.”

The teenager, now a man who uses the handle “ReformedIncel” to keep his internet history out of his offline life, recalls the online incel world of the 1990s and 2000s fondly. It was a welcoming place, one where men who didn’t know how to talk to women could ask the community’s female members for advice (and vice versa).

When we talk about “incels,” we are not talking about all men who are not having sex. Instead, we are talking about a specific subculture of people in various internet forums — subreddits like r/braincels, the cruel troll chat forum 4chan, and dedicated websites like incels.me.

Beyond their shared frustration with not having sex, the incel community is not monolithic. Many of them are simply sad and lonely men, suffering from extreme social anxiety or deep depression. Some of these moderate incels actively police the extremists in their midst; in a sympathetic 2015 profile, the Washington Post’s Caitlin Dewey reported that some incel forums were set up to automatically delete any posts referencing the California shooter.

But many incels have a much more sinister, and specific, worldview — one that the Southern Poverty Law Center sees as part of a dangerous trend toward male radicalization online. These incels post obsessively about so-called “Chads,” meaning sexually successful and attractive men, and “Stacys,” attractive, promiscuous women who sleep with the Chads. Both are positioned as unattainable: The Chad is the masculine ideal, one incel men cannot emulate for reasons of poor genetics, while the Stacy is whom every incel man wants to sleep with but cannot because they aren’t a Chad.

It’s this embrace of helplessness, of their certainty of their own sexual doom, that makes the more extreme incel communities so dangerous. Instead of trying to support each other and work through their issues as a group, the incels in certain communities allow their resentments to curdle. They see the world through the lens of entitlement: They are owed sex but cannot have it because women are shallow. This manifests in a deep and profound hatred for women as a group, which shows up on a very brief scan of some of the more extreme incel communities.

“I have sluts for managers,” one poster on the incel.me forum wrote. “Flat bitch with no ass and loud ugly black landwhale somehow with no ass either … both brag about all the dick they suck.”

But it’s not just individual women that these radical incels hate — it’s society writ large, a society that allows their perceived sexual oppression to go on. The sexual revolution, in particular, comes in for hate: They believe women being freed to make their own sexual choices, rather than being married off to men and made subordinate, is the reason women can choose to sleep with attractive men and ignore the so-called incels.

This is how inceldom becomes a political doctrine: They see themselves as a class, oppressed by a social system that’s rigged in favor of other men. One post on an incel subreddit compared their worldview to Marxism, with incels playing the part of the proletariat and Chad the bourgeoisie. The natural corollary of this idea is clear: If the root of the problem is an unfair social system, then there needs to be a revolution to change it.

This is where the idea of the “Incel Rebellion” that Minassian referenced comes from — sometimes called “Beta Uprising” on incel forums, a reference to beta males. There’s no centralized planning, no incel equivalent to of Osama bin Laden. There are just men on various online forums celebrating violence and forming a mutually supportive echo chamber that justifies harming others, especially women, in the name of the incel uprising.

THE FINAL SOLUTION

Now that we have established that JuiceWRLD is both an Intel and drastically ruining the delicate landscape of hip-hop that has been built upon for generations, there is one final solution that we must enact as a community. Now, I shall detail my plan.

STEP ONE:
– Brand all JuiceWRLD stans
– Preferably with a physical brand on their skin, but a Leakth.is user tag shall suffice for the internet

STEP TWO:
– Establish a eugenic society where all pregnancies must be registered
– If one of the parents is branded a JuiceWRLD Stan, prohibit procreation

STEP THREE:
– Begin extermination of those branded JuiceWRLD stans

Conclusion

Thank you for your time. I will keep this section short and brief. I hope you begin to take action with me. GOOD DAY, GOD bless, shabbat shalom.

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